Why Is The Second bounce So Important?

Why Is The Second bounce So Important?

The second bounce is often used in squash to talk about where you want the ball to land but why is it so important?

Let’s start with a question.

Where do you need to be before the ball bounces?
No where. You don’t need to be anywhere at that point.

Where do you need to be on the first bounce?
No where. You don’t need to be anywhere at that point.

Where do you need to be just after the first bounce?
No where. You don’t need to be anywhere at that point.

Where do you need to be just before the second bounce?
You NEED to be near the ball. This is your last chance to hit. If you miss this chance, you have lost the rally and therefore the point.

Okay, I may have laboured the point, but the second bounce gives the player the maximum time to get to the ball. Players general leave the ball until the last moment to hit. “Why rush when I can take my time, right?”

With regard to a straight drive, you are generally trying to make the second bounce in the back wall nick (the join between the floor and the wall).

If the second bounce is too, short you could be giving your opponent an easy shot. If the second bounce is too deep, you could be making it easy for your opponent. Remember, deep second bounces just come back off the back wall.

Of course, this is all quite hypothetical because it is very rare that we see a perfect second bounce land in the nick.

But why is that?

Well, because your opponent knows that if they leave it, it will be harder to retrieve, so that hit it before it gets there. Ideally, you would be hitting it a little longer so that the opponent wants to leave it come off the back wall but then realizes that is going to be harder and has to rush.

What all this is doing is putting minute amounts of pressure on your opponent.

Over time, this pressure gets too much and they start to make mistakes. That’s when you pounce like a tiger and kill the ball.

Just watch a professional player warm up on court and often you see them driving the ball down the wall and every now and again they just leave and watch it bounce. More often than not, this is the perfect length: second bounce in the nick. If you are curious, they are testing the court conditions.

Start paying attention to this detail and you should see your game improve.

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