Be like a Wizard.

What Gandalf and Nicole David Have In Common And How You Can Learn From Them.

“A wizard is neither early nor late, he arrives exactly when he meant to”, so said Gandalf to one of the Hobbits in one of the Lord of the Rings books.

And that is how a great mover on a squash court is.

Getting to the ball too early is almost as bad as getting there too late – almost.

Have you ever seen those skinny, featherweight squash players who seem to be able to hit the ball so hard? Back in my day, there used to be quite a few players from Pakistan like that.

And then there are those other squash players build like a stevedore on steroids that can’t seem to put ony of the potential power into the ball?

Well, welcome to the world of physics! In particular, timing and momentum.

This means using your body weight in that process.

Ideally, you should be taking your last step just before you make contact with the ball. This means you transfer as much of your bodyweight INTO the shot as possible.

However, you need to be strong enough to control your momentum and not continue to move forward after hitting the ball. This takes leg and core body strength and must be practiced. ANY movement forward after you hit the ball is essentially wasted.

The reality on most squash courts around the world is much different. Players either get to the ball too early and have lost a significant amount of potential power or they get there a fraction of a second late and the momentum is not transfered to the ball.

This is one of the things that can be practiced when doing pairs routines. The smooth motion of movement towards where the ball will be when you want to hit it, the swing as you take the final lunge and return to the T.

Start to pay much more attention to your final step. Make it count.

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